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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how exactly did you source that story. >> reporter: katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a film maker? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly try to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went
: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iranver the persian gulf. it s undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's south. the alliance says the attack happened yesterday. it did not provide the nationalities of those killed. so far this year at least 384 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. most of them have been americans. in economic news, the u.s. housing market showed more signs of recovery in a new report by the real estate data firm, core logic. it said home prices in october were up more than 6% compared with last year. that's the largest gain in more than six years. still, the housing news was not enough to boost wall stre's irits. stocks edged lower again as budget talks in washington showed no signs of progress. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 13 points to close at 12,951. the nasdaq fell five points to close at 2996. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back
on what a chemical attack by bashar al assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative bob baer here to show you. this is showing you what the single impact of saren gas would be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the bo
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
to the cia and department of homeland security. general marks, let me start with you. what are the military options at this stage right now? realistically, what could the use, nato, the international community militarily do if there is an indication that the syrian military's about to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> wolf, that's the key point. in advance of its use what can the u.s. do? and it's clearly having a very robust, very broad intelligence collection apparatus that takes into account all means of collection, technical as well as human intelligence. there are known sites where the chemical weapons are stockpiled, where the production sites are. then there has to be an act to marry those up with the distribution or delivery means. >> a missile. >> a missile, artillery shell, put into a bomb then uploaded under the wings of an aircraft. all those are indicators of what might occur. intelligence has to be very, very robust in order to go after that. then, if it is such that we see that happening in a tactical sense, in other words, there's not much time to respond, we h
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)